What can we learn from health policy making patterns in post-conflict Sierra Leone for post-Ebola times?

By Kate Hawkins

I am a big fan of the IHP newsletter. It lands in the email every Friday and never fails to provide something to make you think, laugh, or get irritated. The editorials by Kristof Decoster are a must read and you can follow him on Twitter. What more could you ask for?

So a huge thanks to the IHP newsletter team for highlighting a blog by our colleague  last week. She argues that:

One of the unresolved challenges in post-crisis settings is the balance between humanitarian aid and the longer-term development approach to rebuilding the health system. We agree that decisions made in the early recovery phase could determine the long term development of the health system. But how, when, why and by whom are those decisions made? We know surprisingly little about that.

Drawing on evidence from a recent paper in Conflict and Health she outlines what happened with human resources for health reforms in Sierra Leone, from the end of the conflict in 2002 until 2012, and suggests some lessons that other countries can learn.

You can read all about it on the IHP website…

And subscribe to the newsletter, you won’t regret it!

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